Blog - Stand UP Foundation

Blog

Ashley's Legacy Wish

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Leaving Behind a Legacy

Every year I ask our graduating seniors to write a memoir of the legacy they would like to leave behind for the raising members. This has always been an important component to what we do, as we are teen initiated and although students graduate I feel it is important for them to leave their final imprint with our current members on their dreams, hopes and inspirations for the years to come. We then invite our alumni back to participate in many different events to continue to share how they are making waves and moving mountains within the community.

I never thought one day I would be composing one of these letters. A letter to all the members with my hopes, dreams aspirations and goals for our members and alumni. In just a few short weeks, Medora and I will be setting off to start our next chapter to our lives in Houston, Texas. I will be relocating to help run, organize and create the school counseling program at St. John's School. I will be a part of an incredible team that's mission is to promote wellness within our school community and foster individual growth.

This is a very bittersweet transition for me.


Logan G

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Leaving Behind Our Senior Legacy


Mia B

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Leaving Behind Our Senior Legacy

Hi everyone, I’m Mia. I just graduated from suncoast high school and I will be attending Stevens Institute of Technology in the fall, majoring in quantitative finance.

I joined wmw the summer after my freshman year. I walked into training that summer with a pout on a my face because I was mad at my mom for making me come. It was not in any way how I had pictured spending my first week of summer, but that was because I had no idea what wmw stood for or what it was.


The Talk From a Student Perspective

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The Talk

From a Student Perspective 

We live in a world where on social media and television, sex is flaunted and glamorized. I use to remember thinking it was only something that people who are in love do. But once I got to eighth grade I started to really learn what our society is really like. I remember about halfway through my eighth grade year, a rumor about how two people had sex in the cafeteria bathroom. When I first heard that rumor, I was disgusted. But after getting over that I thought to myself, “why would anyone do that, did someone force someone. Or did they just want to seem cool?” Our society has made it where, losing your virginity at a young age is the “cool” thing to do. Sometimes though, one of the partners is pressured into doing it. Or not wanting to do it in the first place. 
But they may think speaking up will make them not “cool.”  

TheTalk

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The Talk

Using Your Big Voice

The current discussion about speaking up for sexual harassment with the campaigns like #MeToo are very empowering for everyone. However, I do believe that those campaigns only go on for so long and our cultural norms sneak back in, poisoning our society, the way we feel about ourselves and of course how we look and feel about others.

In a world full of constant media messaging bombardment of who we should be, definitions of what “power and prestige” look like; we are all constantly rattled with how to make the best decisions; for our selves, our loved ones and even our children. We have become subject to the media defining our cultural norms, which impacts our ability to teach children how to listen to their inner voice and feel ok to say “No. This is not ok for me.”


Paige A

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Leaving Behind Our Senior Legacy

Good evening, everyone! For those of you who don’t know me, my name is Paige Adams, and I am a recently-graduated senior from Oxbridge Academy. I am attending Vanderbilt University in the fall and hope to double major in journalism and photojournalism and use a study abroad session in Western Europe to begin my journey obtaining different perspectives of body image in the international fashion world. 


Lexy B.

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Leaving Behind Our Senior Legacy

The first time I heard of women making waves, was from one of my and my sister’s best friend, Lydia. She worked for the camp all summer long and she was so excited to tell us they were making it a yearlong thing. I had no idea what it was at the time, I just remember being surprised by how many people I knew in the group and that so many of them came from different schools. It  wasn’t long before my sister went in for her interview to become a member, and what felt like two minutes later, she was a leading member of women making waves. Pretty soon, stand up foundation began to get major recognition in the community and Adrianna started to tell me more and more about what it was about. It sounded like a great way to get some community service hours, but boy did I not know what I was in for!

 


Mark H

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Leaving Behind Our Senior Legacy

Hi – my name is Mark Hanna. I graduated a few weeks ago from Cardinal Newman High School.  I will be attending Louisiana State University in August. I am a founding member of the Men Moving Mountains which has had a positive impact on my high school years. 


Elaina H.

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Leaving Behind Our Senior Legacy

Sophomore year when I walked into the Women Making Waves office for the first time I don’t think I knew what I was fully getting myself into. I didn’t think that I would immediately bond with the 30 smiling faces I saw the second I walked into the door. Yet, I did. I didn’t think that I would remember my summers as being highlighted by training week, leading workshops and paddle boarding at camp, Yet, I did. I didn’t think that I would be so dedicated to the organization for the remainder of my time in high school, and yet I did. I didn’t think at that moment, walking into the office, that Women Making Waves would have made the biggest impact on my high school experience, but yet it did.

Lindsay K

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Leaving Behind Our Senior Legacy

When I first joined Women Making Waves, it was still just a camp for middle school girls, called “Magic T House”. I remember my mom mentioning it to me, saying that I should join. I refused to go, still unsure of what the camp was all about. I imagined that it would be some sort of weird therapist thing where we would sit around in circles and talk about our feelings all day, which did not appeal to me. I didn't know how wrong I was. My mom forced me to go to the camp, even though I didn't want to go. I didn't know at the time, but that was one of the best things she could have done for me.